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Too much smoke
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dsarphie





Joined: 08 May 2014
Posts: 58



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I'm well aware of the amount of time that it takes to cook the larger pieces of meat.  My point is that if you say something is not going to take on any more smoke after a certain amount of time or after it reaches a certain temperature, then compare a brisket that was smoked for 5 hours then wrapped to finish to a brisket that was in smoke for the entire process.  The second will be much more "smokey" than the first.  If the fire is managed properly it won't taste like an ashtray either.  So how then can it be said that the meat didn't take on any more smoke?
Post Posted: Mon Feb 29, 2016 12:40 pm 
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Wood River BBQ Team





Joined: 16 May 2013
Posts: 426


Location: Tucson, AZ

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dsarphie wrote:
I'm well aware of the amount of time that it takes to cook the larger pieces of meat.  My point is that if you say something is not going to take on any more smoke after a certain amount of time or after it reaches a certain temperature, then compare a brisket that was smoked for 5 hours then wrapped to finish to a brisket that was in smoke for the entire process.  The second will be much more "smokey" than the first.  If the fire is managed properly it won't taste like an ashtray either.  So how then can it be said that the meat didn't take on any more smoke?



We're talking about 2 different things - one is smoke absorbed below the surface of the meat and on the surface. First of all smokes not white and billowy -- it's a gas. As far as the comments as to when the gas penetration stops, the popular belief was it stopped at 140* to 145*. Dr. Blonder has proved it stops at 170* and a pitmaster can believe it or not.

Another myth Dr. Blonder exposed was that lump burns hotter than briquets -- the reverse is true. I still think I'll us lump because I don't like all the junk in briquets but at least now I know what I'm working with.

On another subject -- In my opinion a Lang users can learn by trial and error over a period of time to use his Lang but if a person is serous about using a stick burner they should take the time to review a couple of articles at www.amazingribs.com. The first is "mythbusting the smoke ring" and the second is the most important "what you need to know about wood smoke and combustion". After digesting those 2 articles, a Lang owner will know about running his cooker than 75% of the pitmasters worldwide.

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Wood River BBQ Team
Post Posted: Mon Feb 29, 2016 6:05 pm 
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Fdh1965





Joined: 26 Dec 2015
Posts: 10



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I tried the process of conveyor belting in the wood.  Wow what a difference.  Once it's up to temp, this process is no more white smoke.  I like it.

I also slightly closed the stack exhaust.   This brought the temp up 300-315 but slowed down the burn rate.  

I did have problems with temp swings and running on the hot side.  So I need to cut down the wood to Coke can size instead of full 16" cuts,   That should allow the temp to come down and maintain at the 250 degrees.  I might need to be more adding frequently, but time will tell.

THe result I had, was less strong wood taste and a richer beef flavor.  THinking this is gonna be good.  It is true let exciting every time I fire up my Lang.

This weekend I will do corned beef and chicken.  More to follow.  

Thanks again for the information.

Post Posted: Tue Mar 15, 2016 2:50 am 
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