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blake

how to maintain a clear smokestack.....????

guys/gals,

i know how to fire my smoker up to the temp i want (took some practice but i got it =-)

my question is that when it is time to re-fuel, HOW do i get that smokestack to blow clear as quickly as possible?

for example, every40 min-hour you have to refuel.  when you drop the fuel in (as it catches fire) it will generate some non-clear smoke.  i find that if i open the firebox door it will clear out the smokestack, but when i close it the not-clear smoke re-appears.  eventually it will blow clear BUT .....

do yall just leave the door to the firebox open for a few minutes?
animal

I leave it cracked open until the new wood catches, I also preheat the wood before putting it in, you can put it in the firebox over to the side and let it heat up before putting it directly in the fire or sometimes I put it in the warmer and heat it up that way. I had the option of putting heat directly into my warmed installed on mine. But for the most part having seasoned wood and keeping the door partially open until it catches works. I think you will always get some incomplete combustion unless you run a separate burn station to get the wood going first. We just try to minimize it
icemanrrc

I couldn't agree more...

animal wrote:
I leave it cracked open until the new wood catches, I also preheat the wood before putting it in, you can put it in the firebox over to the side and let it heat up before putting it directly in the fire or sometimes I put it in the warmer and heat it up that way. I had the option of putting heat directly into my warmed installed on mine. But for the most part having seasoned wood and keeping the door partially open until it catches works. I think you will always get some incomplete combustion unless you run a separate burn station to get the wood going first. We just try to minimize it
blake

appreciate it guys.  got some firebrick for my firebox (lined the bottom AND a layer for the top) and ill just set the wood on top of that.  gets pretty hot and should do the trick.  ill crack the door too for a minute.  

muchas muchas gracias amigos!  Very Happy
animal

Maybe is is just me but I will not line my firebox with firebrick. I believe the ash from fires will get between the bricks and down under them, ash will draw in moisture,  ash plus H20 creates acid  which causes corrosion. 1/4 inch of steel is enough insulation for me. I clean the ash out of my firebox regularly. I love this thing too much to cause my own problems. Do you really think you loose that much heat through the bottom of the firebox anyway, last time I checked heat rises and thermal mass under a fire isn't that important to me that I want to risk destroying my firebox.
icemanrrc

My buddy and I purchased our Langs at the same time. He has lined the bottom of his firebox with firebrick and frabricated a metal cap for the firebox that is lined with a fabric that I want to say is made of welding blanket. It fits on top like it's factory made.
He did comparisons of the temperature of the temp of the top of the firebox with a laser thermometer with and without the insulated top. The difference was huge. I can't remember the specific amount of degree difference, but I wanted to say at least 200 degrees difference.
His firebox with both insulated top and firebrick lined bottom is much more fuel efficient than mine. As well as the Langs are made, I wouldn't say you are losing heat from the firebox. It's not like it's leaking or because of bad craftmanship. I think it's fairer to say there is a decent amount of heat that insulating the firebox will capture and utilize.
Whether or not it will cause rust, I am not sure. The firebrick are mostly all universal in size, regardless of brand. They will not fit without having to cut several pieces. If you are making precision cuts, the brick will fit very tightly and what little gap exist, I would think that ash would fill it in. If you have sloppy and loose fit, then I would definitely think you could be setting yourself up for a rust issue.
I would also like to say that my buddy's smoker's firebox has had all of the paint flake off the firebox. My thoughts are that insulating the firebox is causing it to retain so much of the heat that would normally escape, is heating up the box to the point that it is causing the paint to peel off. I have not modified my firebox in any way and all of my paint is still on and looks like new.
I guess if you don't care or if you know of some true high heat paint you could touch up the firebox with, give a shot and see. I would recommend you remove the firebrick every so often and check to see if you have rust as Animal could be saving you some serious grief.
Rusty
blake

i take out my shop vac and vacuum out the firebox after every cook.  sounds like a little much but it really doesn't take much time at all and looks REAL good once finished.  i take out the grate & bricks and the vacuum works like a champ.   i decided to start doing this after seeing how ash sitting in the bottom of my kettle grill rusted the grates.  

the one thing i noticed with the firebrick is that i am going to have to cut it to make the pieces fit.  i got the firebrick because ben recommended it for heat retention.
carter

I did my seasoning burn without the fire brick and my first cook with.  I couldn't tell a big difference between using and not using them as far as temperature.
georgrusel

When I choose a brisket, I lift the brisket in the middle to see how limber it is. I have seen briskets that are stiff as a board, and some that bend over each side of my hand. The stiff ones more than likely have been frozen, and I have noticed that they may not always be as tender as a brisket that is more limber.

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